Art

Art Education

Art Education covers standards set by the Diocese of Phoenix.  Each art lesson typically includes four main components: 1. art history; 2. art elements and principles of design; 3. art production; 4. art criticism. It is a goal for students to be able to focus on improving their skills and craftsmanship, to become responsible citizens as they care for materials and tools, to recognize and be capable of speaking about art in terms of its elements and applied principles, and appreciate the value and meaning in artwork.

Art Curriculum

Grade K: Introduction to skills such as cutting, gluing, overlapping, rolling, painting, printmaking, and drawing; introduction to techniques and processes of proper care for work space, care for tools, and materials; collaboration with classroom curriculum; introduction to artists (such as Van Gogh and Renoir); introduction to the Elements of Art: line, shape, color, form, use of space, value, and pattern; introduction of landscapes and portraits

Grade 1: Introduction to primary and secondary colors, sculpture techniques with dough; practice with processes of proper care for workspace, care for tools, and materials; collaboration with classroom curriculum; introduction to artists (such as Michael Sowa and Mondrian); practice techniques with paint, drawing, cutting, gluing, overlapping, printmaking, rolling, and construction of three dimensional structure; practice with art elements and principles as they are applied to landscapes and portraits

Grade 2: Introduction and practice using the color wheel spectrum, including tertiary colors; techniques with clay; practice with processes of proper care for workspace, care for tools, and materials; collaboration with classroom curriculum; introduction to artists (such as Degas and Audubon); practice with techniques of printmaking, sculpture, drawing from observation, cutting, and overlapping; continued practice with art elements and principles as they are applied to composition

Grade 3: Introduction to how art reflects history, architecture, and cultural values; practice with processes of proper care for workspace, care for tools, and materials; collaboration with classroom curriculum; introduction to artists (such as Wyland and Deville); practice with sculptural and architectural elements; drawing from observation; methods of clay work; continued practice with art elements and principles of design

Grade 4: Introduction to creating illusion by adding value and depth in composition; recognizing and using warm and cool colors in composition; introduction to textiles; further practice with processes of proper care for workspace, care for tools, and materials; collaboration with classroom curriculum; introduction of artists (such as Picasso and Hanoch Piven); practice with drawing from observation; methods of clay work; utilizing elements of art and principles of design

Grade 5:  Introduction to concept of foreshortening and further practice with creating illusion in drawing; further practice with proper care for materials, tools, and workspace; collaboration with classroom curriculum; introduction to artists (such as Dali and O’Keefe); continued practice with drawing, textile work, hand-building techniques with clay, and utilizing elements of art and principles of design; receiving and giving constructive criticism and making improvements

Grade 6:  Introduction to sewing; further practice with proper care for materials, tools, and workspace; collaboration with classroom curriculum; introduction to artists (Leger and Grandma Moses); continued practice with drawing, painting, textile work, clay, and utilizing elements of art and principles of design; receiving/giving constructive criticism and self-evaluation of work

Grades 7-8: Junior High Art Education is part of the elective program. Classes are designed for the duration of one trimester. Students can elect to take a drawing/painting elective, which focuses on several notable artists. Students will create works similar to art movements, such as Impressionism, Surrealism, Op Art, Realism, and Pop Art. Students can elect to take sculptural mediums, which focuses on notable artists and sculptors. Students will learn clay techniques, such as slab work, coiling, weaving, and carving. There is also Advanced Art in which students will develop independent units of study in the medium of choice.

Art Grading Policy

Grades are based on conduct and effort focusing on the SLE’s of Active Catholics, Responsible Citizens, Efficient Communicators, and Active Learners.  In grades 6-8, a second grading component is added which utilizes rubrics to assess student progress toward meeting the main objectives for the unit.